Click here to print this document

ALABASTER WATER BOARD

2005 CONSUMER CONFIDENCE REPORT

JANUARY 1, 2005 – DECEMBER 31, 2005

 

Alabaster

 

 

This is your annual report on drinking water quality.

We are very pleased to provide you with this year’s Annual Water Quality Report. We want to keep you informed about the excellent water services we have delivered to you over the past year. In 1974 the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) was signed into law requiring all water systems that serve the public to meet national standards for water quality. These standards set limits for certain contaminants and require all public water systems to monitor for these contaminants. The Alabaster Water Board routinely tests for these constituents in your drinking water according to federal and state laws. We are pleased to report that our drinking water is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. The table in this report illustrates the constituents detected and tested for beginning January 1, 2005 through December 31, 2005 for both the well water produced by the Alabaster Water Board and the filtered water purchased from the Shelby County Water System. If you have any questions concerning water quality please contact the Water Board Manager, Pete Lucas, at (205) 663-6155. You may also attend the monthly board meeting held on the second Monday of each month at 7:00 PM (alternate date is the Tuesday after the third Monday) at the Municipal Annex Building.

 

 

 

Alabaster Water Board Members

The following individuals serve on the Alabaster Water Board:

Gene Sanders Chairman

Tony Pendleton, Vice-Chairman

Cathy Bradford, Treasurer

Jim McClain, Director

Rick Walters, Director

En Español:

Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua. Tradúzcalo ó hable con alguien que lo entienda bien.

Water Sources

Our goal is and always has been, to provide to you a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. Our water sources are ground water drawn from the Longview Newalla Aquifer by three wells, and surface water from the Coosa River. The wells are all located in the same general area in the vicinity of Ball Park Road in Alabaster. Well water is both chlorinated and fluoridated. The Coosa River source is treated and purchased from the Shelby County Water System after treatment at the Talledega / Shelby Water Treatment Plant.

Contaminants in Drinking Water

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and radioactive material, and it can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

 

Notice: Important Information

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. People who are immuno-compromised such as cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, organ transplant recipients, HIV/AIDS positive or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. People at risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA / CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

All drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

Additional Health Information

To ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include the following:

Microbiological contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.

Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm run-off, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.

Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, storm water runoff, and residential uses.

Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm water run-off and septic systems.

Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

Waiver for Dioxin and Asbestos

Based on a study conducted by ADEM with the approval of the EPA, a statewide waiver for the monitoring of asbestos and dioxin was issued. Thus monitoring for these contaminants was not required.

Source Water Assessment Program

The Alabaster Water Board is pleased to report that it has completed all of the required components of the Source Water Assessment Program (SWAP). The first section, a delineation study of our well area, was completed in 1996. We have also completed a contaminant inventory list of potential sources of contamination. A susceptibility analysis to determine if these sites pose any significant threats and a public awareness meeting were both completed in 2002. The SWAP will be updated as needed. Copies of the Source Water Assessment can be obtained at the Alabaster Water Board office at 213 1st Street North, next to the City Hall.

Wellhead Protection Plan

We at the Alabaster Water Board work around the clock to provide top quality water to every tap. To further safeguard our water source, the Alabaster Water Board developed a wellhead protection plan during 2004 that provides strategies for protecting our water resources. The Wellhead Protection Plan is a voluntary program developed in accordance with the ADEM Wellhead Protection Program Guidance Document. We ask that all our customers help us protect our water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life and our future.

Terminology

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLG – The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL – The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal or MRDLG – The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLG’s do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level or MRDL – the highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

Action Level – The concentration of a contaminant that triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system shall follow.

Treatment Technique (TT) – A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

Variances and Exemptions – ADEM or EPA permission not to meet an MCL or a treatment technique under certain conditions.

Non-Detects (ND) - laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.

Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l) – One part per million corresponds to one minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.

Parts per billion (ppb) – one part per billion corresponds to one minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.

Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – Picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.

Million Fibers per Liter (MFL) – Million fibers per liter.

Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.

Millirems per year (mrem/yr) - Measure of radiation absorbed by the body.

Water Facts:

Public water suppliers process 38 billion gallons of water per day for domestic and public use.

Only 1% of the earth’s water is available for drinking water.

500 customers watering their lawn at a rate of 10 gallons per minute will consume 300,000 gallons of water per hour.

Table of Detected Contaminants

January 1 – December 31, 2005

CONTAMINANT

MCL

Alabaster Water Board

Shelby County Water System

Likely Source of Contamination

Turbidity (NTU)

TT

0.02

0.05

Soil runoff

Inorganic Chemicals

Barium

2

0.07

0.027

Discharge of drilling wastes; discharge from metals refineries; erosion of natural deposits
Copper

AL=1.3

0.007

< 0.0003

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits; leaching from wood preservatives
Fluoride

4

1.14

1.2

Erosion of natural deposits; water additive which promotes strong teeth; discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories
Nitrate

10

0.69

0.01

Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural deposits

Organic Chemicals

 

HAA5

60

< 0.7

0.028

By-product of drinking water chlorination
TTHM

5

2.7

0.06

By-product of drinking water chlorination

 

Other Test Results

January 1 – December 31, 2005

CONTAMINANT

MCL

Alabaster Water Board

Shelby County Water System

Likely Source of Contamination

Bacteriological

Total Coliform Bacteria

< 5%

0

0

Naturally present in the environment

Radiological

Beta/photon emitters (mrem/yr)

4

ND

ND

Decay of natural and man-made deposits
Alpha emitters (pci/l)

15

< 1.3

< 0.7

Erosion of natural deposits
Combined radium (pci/l)

5

ND

ND

Erosion of natural deposits

Inorganic Chemicals

Antimony

6

< 5

< 5

Discharge from petroleum refineries; fire retardants; ceramics; electronics; solder
Arsenic

10

< 5

< 5

Erosion of natural deposits; runoff from orchards; runoff from glass and electronics production wastes
Asbestos (MFL)

7

ND

ND

Decay of natural and man-made deposits
Beryllium

4

< 1

< 1

Discharge from metal refineries and coal-burning factories; discharge from electrical, aerospace, and defense industries
Cadmium

5

< 1

< 1

Corrosion of galvanized pipes; erosion of natural deposits; discharge from metal refineries; runoff from waste batteries and paints
Chromium

100

< 5

< 5

Discharge from steel and pulp mills; erosion of natural deposits
Chloramines

4

ND

ND

By-product of drinking water chlorination
Chlorite

1

ND

ND

By-product of drinking water chlorination
Cyanide

200

< 20

< 20

Discharge from steel and pulp mills erosion of natural deposits
Lead

AL=15

< 3

< 3

Corrosion of household plumbing systems, erosion of natural deposits
Mercury

2

< 1

< 1

Erosion of natural deposits; discharge from refineries and factories; runoff from landfills; runoff from cropland
Nitrite

1

< 0.1

< 0.1

Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural deposits
Selenium

50

< 5

< 5

Discharge from petroleum and metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits; discharge from mines
Thallium

2

< 1

< 1

Leaching from ore-processing sites; discharge from electronics, glass, and drug factories

Organic Chemicals

 

2,4-D

70

< 0.1

< 0.1

Runoff from herbicide used on row crops
2,4,5-TP (Silvex)

50

< 0.2

< 0.2

Residue of banned herbicide
Acrylamide

TT

ND

ND

Added to water during sewage/wastewater treatment
Alachlor

2

< 1

< 1

Runoff from herbicide used on row crops
Atrazine

3

< 2.5

< 2.5

Runoff from herbicide used on row crops
Benzo(a)pyrene[PAHs] (nanograms/l)

200

< 2

< 2

Leaching from linings of water storage tanks and distribution lines
Carbofuran

40

< 1.5

< 1.5

Leaching of soil fumigant used on rice and alfalfa
Chlordane

2

< 0.2

< 0.2

Residue of banned termiticide
Dalapon

200

< 0.2

< 0.2

Runoff from herbicide used on rights of way
Di-(2-ethylhexyl)adipate

400

< 3

< 3

Discharge from chemical factories
Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthlates

6

< 1

< 1

Discharge from rubber and chemical factories
Dinoseb

7

< 0.19

< 0.19

Runoff from herbicide used on soybeans and vegetables
Diquat

20

< 0.4

< 0.4

Runoff from herbicide use
Dioxin[2,3,7,8-TCDD] (picograms/l)

30

ND

ND

Emissions from waste incineration and other combustion; discharge from chemical factories
Endothall

100

< 10

< 10

Runoff from herbicide use
Endrin

2

< 0.01

< 0.01

Residue of banned insecticide
Epichlorohydrin

TT

ND

ND

Discharge from industrial chemical factories; an impurity of some water treatment chemicals
Glyphosate

700

< 6

< 6

Runoff from herbicide use
Heptachlor

400

< 4

< 4

Residue of banned termiticide
Heptachlor epoxide

200

< 2

< 2

Breakdown of heptachlor
Hexachlorobenzene

1

< 0.9

< 0.9

Discharge from metal refineries and agricultural chemical factories
Lindane

200

< 2

< 2

Runoff/leaching from insecticide used on cattle, lumber, gardens
Methoxychlor

40

< 0.1

< 0.1

Runoff/leaching from insecticide used on fruits, vegetables, alfalfa, livestock
Oxamyl [Vydate]

200

< 2

< 2

Runoff/leaching from insecticide used on apples, potatoes and tomatoes
PCBs

500

< 10

< 10

Runoff from landfills; discharge of waste chemicals
Pentachlorophenol

1

< 0.03

< 0.03

Discharge from wood preserving factories
Picloram

500

< 0.14

< 0.14

Herbicide runoff
Simazine

4

< 1

< 1

Herbicide runoff
Toxaphene

3

< 1

< 1

Runoff/leaching from insecticide used on cotton and cattle
Benzene

5

< 0.5

< 0.5

Discharge from factories; leaching from gas storage tanks and landfills
Carbon Tetrachloride

5

< 0.5

< 0.5

Discharge from chemical plants and other industrial activities
Chlorobenzene

100

< 0.5

< 0.5

Discharge from chemical and agricultural chemical factories
Dibromochloropropane

200

< 50

< 50

Discharge from industrial chemical factories
0-Dichlorobenzene

600

< 0.5

< 0.5

Discharge from industrial chemical factories
p-Dichlorobenzene

75

< 0.5

< 0.5

Discharge from industrial chemical factories
1,2-Dichloroethane

5

< 0.5

< 0.5

Discharge from industrial chemical factories
1,1-Dichloroethylene

7

< 0.5

< 0.5

Discharge from industrial chemical factories
cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene

70

< 0.5

< 0.5

Discharge from industrial chemical factories
trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene

100

< 0.5

< 0.5

Discharge from industrial chemical factories
Dichloromethane

5

< 0.5

< 0.5

Discharge from industrial chemical factories
1,2-Dichloropropane

5

< 0.5

< 0.5

Discharge from industrial chemical factories
Ethylbenzene

700

< 0.5

< 0.5

Discharge from petroleum refineries
Ethylene dibromide (nanograms/l)

50

< 10

< 10

Discharge from petroleum refineries
Styrene

100

< 0.5

< 0.5

Discharge from rubber and plastic factories; leaching from landfills
Tetrachloroethylene

5

< 0.5

< 0.5

Leaching from PVC pipes; discharge from factories and dry cleaners
1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene

70

< 0.5

< 0.5

Discharge from textile-finishing factories
1,1,1-Trichloroethane

200

< 0.5

< 0.5

Discharge from metal degreasing sites and other factories
1,1,2-Trichloroethane

5

< 0.5

< 0.5

Discharge from industrial factories
Trichloroethylene

5

< 0.5

< 0.5

Discharge from metal degreasing sites and other factories
Toluene

1

< 0.5

< 0.5

Discharge from petroleum factories
Vinyl Chloride

2

< 0.5

< 0.5

Leaching from PVC pipes; discharge from plastics factories
Xylenes

10

< 0.0005

< 0.0005

Discharge from petroleum factories; discharge from chemical factories

Click here to print this document

 

[menu2.htm]

Copyright (c) 2005-2012 Alabaster Water Board. All rights are reserved.

Web site by: TLM Web Design